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Adaptable Vehicle Interiors

Equipping cars to drive themselves raises the question, What will you do when you’re not at the controls?
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Equipping cars to drive themselves raises the question, What will you do when you’re not at the controls? The answers, says Han Hendriks, chief technology officer for Yanfeng Automotive Interiors, will lead to vastly more adaptable and flexible interiors than are possible in today’s cars.

Future designs will add multi-variable seating options, work stations, new storage features, light-emitting trim panels, much larger displays, anti-microbial surfaces and more, Hendriks says.

He expects the first wave of such innovations will appear in about 2021, with more radical changes likely in 2028-2030.

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