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Cadillac Names Global Directors

Posted: April 15, 2013 at 2:10 amGeneral Motors Co. has hired Steve Majoros, managing director of Campbell Ewald advertising agency, to the newly created post of director of global Cadillac marketing.Majoros joined Campbell Ewald in 1988.
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Posted: April 15, 2013 at 2:10 am

General Motors Co. has hired Steve Majoros, managing director of Campbell Ewald advertising agency, to the newly created post of director of global Cadillac marketing.

Majoros joined Campbell Ewald in 1988. He worked on Chevrolet advertising until the agency lost the account in 2010 after 91 years.

The company also appointed Don Butler, head of Cadillac’s U.S. marketing, to the new job of vice president for the brand’s global strategic development. Butler’s job will include development of new markets, a key part of Cadillac’s quest to become a worldwide marque.

Butler joined GM in 1981 and eventually served in the top marketing jobs for Pontiac and Chevy trucks.

Both executives will report to global Cadillac chief Bob Ferguson.

Cadillac has predicted it will boost sales this year by roughly one-third to nearly 200,000 vehicles in the U.S. and two-thirds to 50,000 units in China. The brand’s domestic volume surged 38% to 42,700 vehicles in the January-March period. 

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