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Car Colors Evolving?


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If you’ve ever paid much attention to brochures for car models, you’ve undoubtedly noticed that the names given to the various colors—no matter what the vehicle—make descriptions on overblown restaurant menus seem scientifically objective.

Part of this naming approach probably has a lot to do with the fact that by and large consumers select the same colors.

But there may be hope for automotive designers who are looking for something that is a little more. . .colorful. And we’re not just talking about “Frozen Berry Blue” or “Dark and Stormy Night Black.” Or so indicates the results of the lasts automotive color trend report from BASF Automotive Coatings.

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“Although popular stable colors such as silver, black and white make up approximately 50 to 80% of current production, there is a rich diversity of potential shades that is returning to the market,” said Paul Czornij, technical manager for the BASF Color Excellence group. He added, “The increasing inclination of society is to celebrate beauty in earth tones and more traditional green and blue hues is the basis for this trend.”

And cueing on green, as in the color and the environmental inclination, Mark Gutjar, head of Design for BASF in Europe said, “There are signs from automakers and consumers that the desire for more color on the roads is continuing. We will be tapping into further color spaces, such as bronzes and emeralds. The continued high value assigned to the notion of ecology may now again be signified by the color green.”

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