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Carbon Fiber Oil Valve

Although the use of carbon-fiber reinforced composites tends to be focused on body panels or structures, there are other places where the material can provide benefits, such as in an oil control valve.
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Although the use of carbon-fiber reinforced composites tends to be focused on body panels or structures, there are other places where the material can provide benefits, such as in an oil control valve, where the material is being used to replace an aluminum valve with benefits including reduced weight, reduced manufacturing costs and improved engine components. The injection-molded material is a polyestersulfone resin, Sumiploy CS5530 from Sumitomo Chemical Advanced Technologies (sumikamaterials.com), chopped carbon fiber and a proprietary additive that enhances wear resistance and thermal stability. The valve has high dimensional accuracy, thermal stability (−40 to 150° C), low coefficient of friction, chemical resistance to engine oils, high fatigue strength, and creep resistance.

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