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Design/Development Tip

Last week at the Center for Automotive Research Management Briefings Seminars, Jeevak Badve, vice president, Strategic Growth, Sundberg-Ferar, a design and development firm that’s been around since 1934, so it must be doing something right, made a presentation during a session titled: “The Car of Tomorrow: Design and Technology.” The panel was moderated by John Waraniak, vp of Vehicle Technology at the Specialty Equipment Market Association, one of the industry’s most positive and provocative figures (e.g., “You can’t fake true cool,” he told the assembled auto people, pointing out that authenticity matters more than ever, particularly if one is interested in maintaining relevance to the emerging younger market). Jeevak Badve Anyway, Badve, in a machine-gun fast delivery, spoke of the ways and means to develop products that have a real reason for being (one of the Sunberg-Ferar slogans is “No More Porridge,” not because they have anything against breakfast, but they do have something against bland), the methodology that they use at their firm to create products that are not merely different, but potentially profitable.

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Last week at the Center for Automotive Research Management Briefings Seminars, Jeevak Badve, vice president, Strategic Growth, Sundberg-Ferar, a design and development firm that’s been around since 1934, so it must be doing something right, made a presentation during a session titled: “The Car of Tomorrow: Design and Technology.” The panel was moderated by John Waraniak, vp of Vehicle Technology at the Specialty Equipment Market Association, one of the industry’s most positive and provocative figures (e.g., “You can’t fake true cool,” he told the assembled auto people, pointing out that authenticity matters more than ever, particularly if one is interested in maintaining relevance to the emerging younger market).

J

Jeevak Badve

Anyway, Badve, in a machine-gun fast delivery, spoke of the ways and means to develop products that have a real reason for being (one of the Sunberg-Ferar slogans is “No More Porridge,” not because they have anything against breakfast, but they do have something against bland), the methodology that they use at their firm to create products that are not merely different, but potentially profitable.

And one of the points he made is this:

“If we want to design a tent, we'll benchmark tents, but we’ll also benchmark the camping experience.”

Badve explained that while many companies concentrate on the object, the use and the environment cannot be overlooked. By looking at what something is supposed to do and the time and place that it will do it, the design solution might be entirely different than you otherwise might think.

Badve also recommended: “Stop trying to be all things to all people. Start by being something to someone.”

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