| 2:21 PM EST

EY: Interiors for Self-Driving Cars

In the not-too-distant future, fully autonomous vehicles will be the norm rather than the exception, redefining urban mobility as we know it — and they will be shared, connected and green. For vehicle manufacturers, this trend poses immense opportunities, EY notes in this 12-page report.

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In the not-too-distant future, fully autonomous vehicles will be the norm rather than the exception, redefining urban mobility as we know it — and they will be shared, connected and green.
 
For vehicle manufacturers, this trend poses immense opportunities, EY notes in this 12-page report. But there's a clear risk that mobility-as-a-service could become a commodity, which could severe the relationship between automakers and their customers. 

EY's report says manufacturers can defend their position by finding a way to customize vehicle interiors to both delight and deliver a personalized, connected in-vehicle experience.

 

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