| 5:30 AM EST

How Fast Can a Motorcycle Go?

While we’ve noted that the Bloodhound SSC is being prepared to run for a land speed record, it is worth noting that Triumph Motorcycles has announced that next month it plans to run for a record at the Bonneville Salt Flats.
#Suzuki #oem #TriumphMotorcycles

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

While we’ve noted that the Bloodhound SSC is being prepared to run for a land speed record, it is worth noting that Triumph Motorcycles has announced that next month it plans to run for a record at the Bonneville Salt Flats.

Yes, a motorcycle.

So what do you think the world record is right now?

Remember: a motorcycle.

The Federation Internationale de Motocyclisme-certified record is held by the TOP 1 Ack Attack, a “streamliner” bike that was built by Mike Akatiff, owner of Ack Technologies, a motorcycle that is powered by two 1,299-cc Suzuki Hayabusa engines that are running a single Garrett turbocharger.

Top speed over the 11-mile course: 376.8 mph.

Yes, a motorcycle.

376.8 mph.

Triumph

The bike that will make the challenge is the Triumph Infor Rocket Streamliner.

The Triumph, which will be piloted (which is certainly an accurate word in this case) by Guy Martin, features carbon Kevlar monocoque construction with two turbocharged Triumph Rocket III engines producing a combined 1,000 bhp @ 9,000 rpm. It runs methanol. The motorcycle is 25.5 feet long, 2 feet wide and 3 feet tall.

In recent testing, the bike hit 274.2 mph, which gives Triumph confidence that it has the potential to beat the Ack Attack.

All they need to do is get an additional 102.7 mph and they’ll be all set.

(I don’t know about you, but I don’t think I’d even want to go 102.7 mph on a motorcycle, streamlined Kevlar packaging or not.)

 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Creating a Low-Cost Chassis Architecture

    The engineers at Zenos Cars have combined recycled carbon fiber, drinking straws and aluminum to create a chassis for a low-volume sports car.

  • Economy Comes to Carbon Fiber Parts (?)

    Have economies of scale come to the production of automotive parts with carbon fiber materials?

  • Breaking Down the Chevy Bolt

    Sandy Munro and his team of engineers and costing analysts at Munro & Associates were contacted by UBS Research—an arm of the giant banking and investment firm—and asked whether it was possible to do a teardown and cost assessment of the Chevrolet Bolt EV.