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Isetta Updated


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The Isetta, which actually debuted in Italy in 1953, is probably most closely associated with BMW, which started building the two-seater in 1955, having done some extensive re-engineering of the Italian original. Who would imagine that the manufacturer of The Ultimate Driving Machine would have built a quirky car like that?

BASF has recently done an extensive restoration of a 1958 BMW Isetta 250, using much of its contemporary tech for what it is calling the “MySetta.”

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They developed a two-tone finish that was applied by its master spray painter, Michael Wichmann, at the BASF Coatings’ Refinish Competence Center in Münster. The water-borne colors used are Big White and Bluetta, both specially formulated for the car.

Inside, they created soft-touch interior surfaces using its Steron system, which uses a silicon matrix that has a laser engraved surface and a sprayed polyurethane dispersion to achieve the desired form.

Seat covers were also made with Steron, with Elastoflex W polyurethane foam used for the cushions.

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