| 3:24 PM EST

Lexus LFA: You Can Dream

“The development of the LFA”—552 hp and 354 lb-ft. of torque from a 4.8-liter V10 that powers the car that features Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) construction to a top speed of 202 mph—“was unlike any other Lexus,” said Mark Templin, Lexus group vice president and general manager.   For one thing, rather than outsourcing the CFRP, the engineering team developed the processes in house not only to assure the quality of the LFA build, but so as to have internal knowledge for subsequent projects.
#Lexus #Toyota #Carbon

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

“The development of the LFA”—552 hp and 354 lb-ft. of torque from a 4.8-liter V10 that powers the car that features Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) construction to a top speed of 202 mph—“was unlike any other Lexus,” said Mark Templin, Lexus group vice president and general manager.

 

L L

L L

For one thing, rather than outsourcing the CFRP, the engineering team developed the processes in house not only to assure the quality of the LFA build, but so as to have internal knowledge for subsequent projects.

Templin continued, “Minute details were engineered to provide an engaging and serious supercar that delivers impressive performance on and off the race track.”

Now here’s the part where it may get a little sad for some of you:

“Only 500 will ever be built worldwide, and each will be assembled to customer order, offering a once-in-a-lifetime chance to be part of a small, exclusive group of individuals.”

Chances are having the car will be a whole lot more meaningful than being a member of the club.

The LFA, which is to go into its exclusively limited production run in December 2010, is to be hand-assembled at the “Lexus LFA Works” within the Motomachi Plant in Toyota City. The production rate: no more than 20 per month.

L

RELATED CONTENT

  • How Real Is Additive Manufacturing?

    There is a lot of discussion about how 3D printing/rapid prototyping/additive manufacturing is revolutionizing manufacturing, including automotive manufacturing.

  • Metal to Plastic Under the Hood

    Several plastic makers are now producing components and subsystems once considered the sole domain of steel and-yes-even aluminum. Thermoplastic can mean up to a 30 to 40% weight reduction over equivalent metal components in many under hood applications, but cost reductions have gained the most attention. That's right: plastic components being cost competitive with metal.

  • Hyundai’s Remarkable Hybrid

    Hyundai enters the American market with a new parallel hybrid system that uses lithium-polymer batteries and the same six-speed automatic found in non-hybrid versions of the 2011 Sonata.