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Manufacturing and the Digital Twin

Computer-aided design and manufacturing enable designers to develop digital objects, create virtual factories to produce them and run simulations to see how the plant would work in the real world.

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Computer-aided design and manufacturing enable designers to develop digital objects, create virtual factories to produce them and run simulations to see how the plant would work in the real world.

Once the factory goes into operation, the simulation tool is put away. But what if data from the real factory could be fed back into the simulation to compare actual production against the simulated ideal? Prof. Michael Grieves at the Florida Institute of Technology says the result could be manufacturing that is cheaper, faster and more accurate.

Grieves explains how this new approach to manufacturing in this 7-page white paper.

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