| 3:59 PM EST

Material for electronic apps deployed.

To produce it high-voltage shield connectors—the large 200-ampre model shown here connects auto battery packs and inverters; the smaller, 20-ampere 3-pin model connects auto compressors and electronic control units—Korea Electric Terminal Co. (KET) selected hydrolysis-resistant PBT resins from DuPont Company (dupont.com). “At KET we had originally planned to develop the parts using nylon PA66 because of its good mechanical properties, but PA66 could not meet the OEMs electrical resistance requirements under high temperature testing conditions”—minimum 500 MOhm at 120°C and DC 500V). “Crastin HR HFS provides the solution because it has toughness and excellent electrical performance even in high temperature conditions,” said Hoon Kim, R&D Team Leader at KET.
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To produce it high-voltage shield connectors—the large 200-ampre model shown here connects auto battery packs and inverters; the smaller, 20-ampere 3-pin model connects auto compressors and electronic control units—Korea Electric Terminal Co. (KET) selected hydrolysis-resistant PBT resins from DuPont Company (dupont.com). “At KET we had originally planned to develop the parts using nylon PA66 because of its good mechanical properties, but PA66 could not meet the OEMs electrical resistance requirements under high temperature testing conditions”—minimum 500 MOhm at 120°C and DC 500V). “Crastin HR HFS provides the solution because it has toughness and excellent electrical performance even in high temperature conditions,” said Hoon Kim, R&D Team Leader at KET.

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