11/25/2019

Mercedes Electric

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Yes, its EV SUV is coming. But isn’t this a bit. . .late?

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Mercedes EQC 400

The Mercedes EQC 400. Fashionably. . .late. (Images: Mercedes)

The headline for the release announcing the EQC 400 4MATIC reads:

“Electric Now Has a Mercedes-Benz”

As though the category “Electric” has finally arrived, finally gotten a Mercedes. Lucky Electric. Or so they seem to imply.

A more apt approach—given that Mercedes is more than fashionably late to this party of electric vehicles, with competition from Audi, Jaguar, BMW and that company in California—would be “Mercedes-Benz Now Has an Electric.”

Well, it will in the U.S. market early next year.

Right now the details are rather, well, sketchy. There is an 80-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that drives two electric motors, one for the front axle and one for the rear. The former is for low to medium loads while the latter is for when one gets her or his foot in it. The vehicle produces a maximum 402 hp and 561 lb-ft of torque.

But the curb weight is TBD. The range—largely predicated on things like the curb weight—is not mentioned, even though that is unquestionably a key consideration for an EV intender.

Whether it is a Mercedes-Benz or not.

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