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Process Engineering for an Automated Turning Cell

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How does the average shop go about doing all the process engineering to make sure they get the best return on an automated turning center? Murata Machinery USA, makers of Muratec automated twin-spindle turning centers, breaks it down.

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When you consider the whole cost scenario of production turning—including machine, labor, spindle utilization, tooling, workholding, quality and other factors—the automated solution can be substantially more productive, and less expensive overall.

 

 

It may seem like buying a cheaper standalone machine tool saves money, and sometimes that’s true. But when it comes to mid- to high-volume turned parts, the economics can quickly turn in another direction. When you consider the whole cost scenario of production turning—including machine, labor, spindle utilization, tooling, workholding, quality and other factors—the automated solution can be substantially more productive, and less expensive overall.

But how does the average shop go about doing all the process engineering to make sure they get the best return on a rather considerable investment? Fortunately, Murata covers all of the engineering for them so they don’t have to. Hand Murata a part, specify the volumes and quality requirements, and Murata handles the rest.

In these turnkey systems, Murata engineers develop every aspect of the machining process…READ MORE.

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