12/10/2019

Putting a Fine Point on Vehicle Locator Tech

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If you want your car to drive itself, it has to know precisely where it is at all times. GPS alone isn’t up to the task, says Mark Vogel of Mitsubishi Electric.

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If you want your car to drive itself, it has to know precisely where it is at all times.

The GPS technology cars use today in their navigation systems is accurate to only about 15 feet. That’s enough to tell you what road your on, but it isn’t nearly sharp enough to help a self-driving car change lanes or know where to stop at an intersection, notes Mark Vogel, portfolio director for safety domain control systems at Mitsubishi Electric.

That’s where the company’s new HD Locator system comes in. It can pinpoint a vehicle’s position within one inch, thanks to high-definition maps, dual-frequency GPS, an inertia module and the software to integrate all those inputs, Vogel says.

HD Locator is in advanced development and is expected to reach the market soon. Click HERE to learn more about Mitsubishi Electric technologies.

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