12/16/2019

Putting Material in Its Place

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Shedding weight to make cars more efficient is complicated by the economic advantages of using as many of the same components as possible in multiple models, says Altair Engineering’s Richard Yen.

Shedding weight to make cars more efficient is complicated by the economic advantages of using as many of the same components as possible in multiple models.

Richard Yen, Altair Engineering’s senior vice president of global automotive business, says carmakers use the 34-year-old company’s high-performance computer modeling software to more accurately make structural decisions about the amount and placement of materials. The process, he adds, is occurring earlier and earlier in the design and engineering process.

This year’s winners of Altair Engineering’s Enlighten awards are the Jeep Wrangler SUV and Ferrari Portofino sports car, which are 179 lbs and 203 lbs lighter, respectively, that prior models.

Click HERE to learn more about Altair Engineering’s capabilities.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Designing the 2019 Ram 1500

    Ram Truck chief exterior designer Joe Dehner talks about how they’ve developed the all-new pickup. “We’ve been building trucks for over 100 years,” he says. “Best I could come up with is that this is our 15th-generation truck.”  

  • 8 Rules for Getting Things Done Through People

    Effective management is a timeless skill—as demonstrated by this treasure of an article from the AutoBeat Group archive. Although the tools of the trade have changed and proliferated, the basics remain the same. Here are 8 old school (and just darn practical) rules for being an excellent manager. 

  • Insight: The Toyota Product Development System’s Implementation Challenges

    For conducting business in the U.S. market, Toyota has historically had several separate business entities: a sales and distribution company headquartered in California (Toyota Motor Sales, USA); manufacturing operations (Toyota Motor Manufacturing North America); a racing subsidiary (Toyota Racing Development, USA); the Toyota Technical Center for R&D in Ann Arbor; and a design facility in California (Calty Design Research, Inc.). On April 1, 2006, Toyota merged its R&D operations and its manufacturing operations into a single company.