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Urban Mobility Redefined

Urban Mobility Redefined examines such emerging options to traditional personal transportation as ride-share, car-share and other non-traditional modes.

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Urban Mobility Redefined examines such emerging options to traditional personal transportation as ride-share, car-share and other non-traditional modes. Among its findings: boundaries between these choices are blurring as providers find new ways to integrate transport alternatives.

These options—and how individuals pay for them—were originally envisioned for residents in megacities. But they are being successfully introduced in smaller cities too.

The challenge for would-be service providers is to develop effective business models. This 16-page EY analysis details the steps to success, which include matching the right options with the right cities, identifying the best business features and focusing on the elements necessary for profitability.

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