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“Sleigh Bells Ring. . .”: Autoline After Hours

As it will be just a few more days until Christmas, how do you combine your interest in the auto industry and your desire to hear some sounds of the holidays? (source:  blog.thedetroithub.com) Well, as happens every year at this time, “Autoline After Hours” has its Presents & Coal show, during which time plaudits and brickbats are given/applied to people and products in the industry by a group of automotive journalists.
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As it will be just a few more days until Christmas, how do you combine your interest in the auto industry and your desire to hear some sounds of the holidays?

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(source:  blog.thedetroithub.com)

Well, as happens every year at this time, “Autoline After Hours” has its Presents & Coal show, during which time plaudits and brickbats are given/applied to people and products in the industry by a group of automotive journalists.

This year, Mark Phelan of the Detroit Free Press and Scott Burgess of Yahoo! Autos join host John McElroy and me to hand out what we think are appropriate for the season. So this ranges from GM Product Development head Mark Reuss to vp of Business Development at Tesla Diarmuid O’Connell, from Volkswagen to Volvo.

And there is a bit of spirited debate at times—and I don’t mean Christmas spirit--, such as Burgess and Phelan on the Hyundai Santa Cruz concept vehicle.

OK. So while the Presents & Coal show is in one sense a “sound of the holidays,” that’s certainly not what you probably have in mind.

So as the informercials have it: But wait! there’s more!

And the “more” are 19 members of the Motor City Chorale in the studio who share wonderfully rousing renditions of many of your yuletide favorites.

Because this is “Autoline After Hours,” and because it is all about the industry, know that the Motor City Chorale isn’t just any group of talented individuals.

Once—starting in 1933—they were the General Motors Chorus. That’s right: the official chorus of GM. As Motor City Chorale president Sue Frost explains on the show, back in the proverbial day many corporations had their own choirs, something that has been slowly winnowed away due to financial considerations. General Motors ended its support of the group in 1978. Once, it was a requirement to be employed by or to have an immediate family member employed by GM to be part of the chorus. (Frost, for example, is a retired GM lean manufacturing engineer.) Now it is opened up to people who worked for other companies, like Chrysler.

Even if you don’t watch the show, you certainly want to give it a listen.

And you can watch and listen right here:

 

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