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Volvo to Head Self-Driving Car Test in Sweden

Posted: December 3, 2013 at 3:01 am Volvo Car Corp. and Swedish researchers and transport agencies plan to begin a 100-car test of autonomous vehicles on public roads by 2017.
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Posted: December 3, 2013 at 3:01 am

Volvo Car Corp. and Swedish researchers and transport agencies plan to begin a 100-car test of autonomous vehicles on public roads by 2017.

The project, dubbed “Drive Me,” will get underway next year. Volvo’s partners include the Lindholmen Science Park, City of Gothenburg, the Swedish Transport Administration and the Swedish Transport Agency.

The fleet will be operated over some 50 km (31 miles) of public roads in and around Gothenburg. Volvo describes the roads as commuter arteries that include expressways with frequent traffic queuing.

Volvo says all the test cars will use the company’s new scalable product architecture, which will debut in 2014 with the next-generation Volvo XC90 crossover. The company says the technology involved will enable drivers to “hand over the driving when the circumstances are appropriate.”

The test cars also will be equipped to park themselves without a driver on board, according to Volvo.

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