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Aston Martin Electrifies Classic Cars

Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd. has developed a conversion kit to retrofit its classic cars with electric powertrains.
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Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd. has developed a conversion kit to retrofit its classic cars with electric powertrains.

The program is expected to launch next year under the Heritage EV name, starting with an electrified 1970 DB6 MkII Volante (pictured). Pricing and specifications will be announced later.

The electric “cassette” package contains the battery, electric motor, controllers and necessary cabling. The system can be bolted into existing Aston Martin models in place of the piston engine and 12-volt battery.

Aston Martin says the process also can be reversed if owners want to return their vehicle to its original form. Other changes include adding a small cockpit screen that displays information about the battery and motor.

Components will be borrowed from the upcoming Rapid E electric supercar. The carmaker’s Aston Martin Works classic car unit will complete the conversion process at its facility in Newport Pagnell, England, facility.

In August, Jaguar Land Rover Ltd. announced similar plans to electrify some of its classic nameplates. The E-Type roadster will be the first model to get the treatment, which includes a 295-hp electric motor and 40-kWh lithium-ion battery that is expected to provide a 170-mile driving range.

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