| 1:43 PM EST

GM Unit Stresses Driver Training in Autonomous Cars

General Motors Co.’s Cruise Automation unit says it puts backup drivers and auditors through extensive training before allowing them to participate in real-world autonomous vehicle tests. 
#people #GeneralMotors #tech

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

General Motors Co.’s Cruise Automation unit says it puts backup drivers and auditors through extensive training before allowing them to participate in real-world autonomous vehicle tests.

The carmaker detailed the program in an update to the 2018 Self-Driving Safety Report is issued earlier this year.

Cruise’s fleet of self-driving test cars have a steering wheel and foot pedals that allow backup drivers to take control if necessary. An additional support person rides along in the front passenger seat to monitor and record vehicle performance.
 
During the month-long training program, vehicle operators practice on closed driving courses. They review protocols for how and when to take control of a vehicle and what to do in the event of anaccident. Participants are required to complete pre- and post-drive checklists, in-vehicle audits, exams and incident-response drills.
 
Cruise also has established rules to help prevent human error that can stem from boredom, exhaustion and distraction during autonomous vehicle testing. This includes limiting the number of driver hours, mandating regular breaks and ensuring routes don’t interfere with scheduled shift changes.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Camaro Hot Wheels

    While at the Tokyo Motor Show this week various vehicle manufacturers were showing off all manner of cars and crossovers and transportation devices that typically had to do with something autonomous, connected and/or electrified (ACE, as CAR’s Brett Smith categorizes this burgeoning field), the guys from Chevy were in El Segundo, California, showing off a different take on what can best be described as “toys for boys”—boys who do or don’t have driver’s licenses.

  • Hyundai Shops for a Partner to Make Electric Scooters

    Hyundai Motor Co. is looking for a domestic partner to mass-produce the fold-up Ioniq electric scooter it unveiled at last year’s CES show in Las Vegas, a source tells The Korea Herald.

  • Another Reason to Be Nervous About Autonomous Vehicles

    Although all OEMs and suppliers do their utmost best to assure nothing but top-notch quality is achieved for their vehicles and systems, sometimes things simply go wrong because, well, that’s just how the Universe is.