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Dassault Tops Sustainability Rankings

Dassault Systemes was named the world’s Most Sustainable Corporation by Corporate Knights, a Toronto-based magazine and research firm.
#Valeo #Intel #Autodesk

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Dassault Systemes was named the world’s Most Sustainable Corporation by Corporate Knights, a Toronto-based magazine and research firm.

Now in its 14th year, the Global 100 list ranks companies on 17 performance indicators that include environmental, manufacturing, social, financial, tax, supplier, leadership diversity, salaries, product and innovation metrics. The ratings consider about 4,000 companies, each with a market value of at least $1 billion.

Dassault, which placed 11th in last year’s rankings, had an overall score of 86% this year. The French software and product lifecycle management specialist was praised for its digitalization technologies that help customers eliminate waste and mistakes throughout a product’s development and production life. In addition to automotive and other industries, Dassault’s tools are now used to model entire cities as they become increasingly connected with the surrounding infrastructure.

Following Dassault in this year’s ratings are Finnish oil and gas giant Neste and French auto interiors supplier Valeo, with scores of 85% and 84%, respectively.

The top U.S.-based company is Cisco Systems, which finished seventh with a score of 77%. Two other tech companies with an automotive presence—Autodesk and Siemens—also tallied 77% scores. Siemens topped last year’s ratings.

BMW is the highest ranked carmaker this year, placing 17th on the list with a score of 73%. Other rated automotive companies are Honda (21st), Intel (26), Nvidia (59), Daimler (60), Nissan (68) and Renault (90).

The Top 100 includes companies from 22 different countries, led by the U.S. with 17 entries. Nearly half (47) of this year’s companies, including Valeo, are new to the list.

Corporate Knights attributes much of the high turnover rate to an updated methodology that now includes the percentage of a company’s business derived from “clean” products and services.​​​​

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