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Carmakers Team with SAE on Test Rules for Autonomous Cars

Ford, General Motors, Toyota and SAE International have formed a consortium to establish safety and testing guidelines for self-driving vehicles.
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Ford, General Motors, Toyota and SAE International have formed a consortium to establish safety and testing guidelines for self-driving vehicles.

The new Automated Vehicle Safety Consortium (AVSC) will be based in Troy, Mich. Additional companies could join the group later.

The consortium will be headed by Edward Straub, who previously was the technical program director and chief safety officer at the American Center for Mobility in Ypsilanti, Mich. He also worked with the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center.

Initially, AVSC plans to identify common safety principles needed for Level 4 and 5 autonomous systems. The partners also plan to share testing and development experiences to compile industry best practices.

The first set of best practices are expected to be released later this year. These could provide the basis for formal standards.

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