| 12:11 AM EST

Ford Says Time Is Now to Push EVs in U.S.

Electric vehicles account for less than 2% of the U.S. market, but Ford Motor Co. says now is the time to roll out new models and educate consumers about their advantages.
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Electric vehicles claim less than 2% of the U.S. passenger vehicle market, but Ford Motor Co. says now is the time to roll out new models and educate consumers about their advantages.

EVs still cost more than conventional vehicles. But the gap is narrowing dramatically, Ted Cannis, head of Ford’s global electric vehicle program, tells the Associated Press. He points to rapidly falling component and battery prices.

Cannis notes that electric powertrains offer impressive performance. Their more compact hardware also gives carmakers more design flexibility. “You can give things to the customer they never had before,” Cannis declares.

Ford will unveil the first in an array of new all-electric vehicles—a Mustang-inspired crossover—a week from now at the Los Angeles auto show. The car will boast a range of about 300 miles per charge, according to Cannis. Five more EV models are due by 2022, including an all-electric iteration of the F-Series large pickup truck.

Cannis says Ford’s upcoming EVs will cater to the company’s strongest markets, where profit margins are strongest: performance vehicles, commercial vans and F-Series pickups.

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