| 10:42 AM EST

German Court Rules on VW Diesel Compensation

A German court says Volkswagen customers in the country who unknowingly bought diesels rigged to cheat on emission tests are entitled to compensation from the company.
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An appeals court in Stuttgart says Volkswagen AG customers in the country who unknowingly bought diesels rigged to cheat on emission tests are entitled to compensation, but those who purchased after the scandal broke are not.

The German court says thousands of plaintiffs who purchased diesel powered cars from VW Group between 2013 and 2015 may demand compensation for the purchase price of their vehicles, minus usage.

VW admitted in September 2015 that it had doctored 11 million diesels worldwide, including 1.5 million in Germany. The appellate court says plaintiffs who bought a VW diesel in 2016 or later are not eligible for relief because the publicity about the scandal made them aware of the company’s wrongdoing.

VW has paid out about €30 billion ($33 billion) in fines, compensation, buybacks and environmental restitution—most of it in the U.S.— since the scandal was revealed.

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