| 3:35 PM EST

GM Testing Peer-to-Peer Car-Sharing Service

General Motors Co.’s Maven mobility unit has launched a peer-to-peer car-sharing pilot program in Chicago, Detroit and Ann Arbor, Mich.
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General Motors Co.’s Maven mobility unit has launched a peer-to-peer car-sharing pilot program in Chicago, Detroit and Ann Arbor, Mich.

Dubbed "Peer Cars," the program allows owners and eligible lessees to rent their 2015 and newer Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet and GMC vehicles to Maven users. Vehicle owners set rental rates—within a 20% range higher or lower than Maven’s recommendations—and receive 60% of the fee, with the rest going to Maven.

Users are expected to return rentals in the same condition as it was when they pick up a vehicle. It’s up to the owner to keep the vehicle clean and fueled.

GM provides $1 million insurance policies for vehicles while they’re being rented. The carmaker says all drivers will be “fully vetted” before they can participate in the program.

Following initial feedback from the pilot program, Maven plans to expand the program to other cities later this year. The company expects to eventually open the Peer Car program to non-GM models.

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