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Karma Teases Electric Sedan

Future models to wear GS badging
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Karma Automotive has updated its future vehicle plans.

The carmaker, which launched the Revero GT plug-in hybrid sedan a year ago, says it will introduce its first full electric vehicle by the end of 2021.

2022 Karma GS teaser (Image: Karma)

Expected to be named the GSe-6, the new model will be part of Karma’s GS family of vehicles. The series will include a mix of hybrids and EVs.

The GSe-6, which originally had been expected to be called the GTE, will feature several battery options. The top-end 100-kWh unit will have an estimated driving range of more than 300 miles.

Karma released the first teaser image of the EV this week.

Cost Savings

The vehicles will be based on the Revero GT. But they will be more affordable, relatively speaking, than the $145,000 luxury hybrid sedan.

"Cost reductions in the battery ownership model, streamlining our supply chain and standardized production methods also allowed for a new, more attainable pricing structure for the GS lineup, allowing for higher market penetration, opening up the market to a larger group of entry-level luxury buyers," says Karma CEO Lance Zhou.

Interested buyers can reserve the new EV for a $100 refundable deposit.

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