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Mahindra Eyes Former Buick Plant Site in Mich.

India’s Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd. says it might build a manufacturing plant on a 364-acre site in Flint, Mich., that was once part of General Motors Co.’s “Buick City” complex.
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India’s Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd. says it might build a manufacturing plant on a 364-acre site in Flint, Mich., that was once part of General Motors Co.’s “Buick City” complex.

The site has been unused since GM’s bankruptcy in 2010. Mahindra says it is out of capacity at its small assembly facility in Auburn Hills, Mich., which makes the Roxor, a Jeeplike SUV certified only for off-road use and would use a new factory in part to make unspecified future products.

Mahindra says it is in discussions with several states about potential plant locations. It has signed a letter of intent to acquire the Buick site from the RACER Trust. The selection will depend upon sufficient financial incentives from the state of Michigan, according to the company.

The deal also hinges upon the outcome of Mahindra’s bid for a $6 billion deal to supply 180,000 next-generation mail delivery vehicles to the U.S. Postal Service. Mahindra is one of five contenders for the deal, which is expected to be awarded later this year.

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