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New Tire Improves with Age

A new passenger car tire developed by Michelin & Cie. features a tread design and unique rubber compound that retains wet grip performance as the tire wears in part by opening up its tread as it wears down.
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A new passenger car tire developed by Michelin & Cie. features a tread design and unique rubber compound that retains wet grip performance as the tire wears in part by opening up its tread as it wears down.

Michelin's EverGrip tread

Normal tires lose their ability to resist hydroplaning as they wear because their beveled grooves lose depth and get narrower. That reduces their ability to pump water away from the tread. Michelin says the grooves on its new Premier A/S EverGrip tires get slightly wider as the tread wears. The tire also reveals new grooves on the tire's shoulder as the rubber wears down.

The tire also gets extra wet-weather grip from a compound that contains unusually large amounts of silica that contribute to better grip and sunflower oil that enhances traction at cool temperatures.

Michelin plans to introduce the Premier A/S series this spring in 32 sizes for a variety of passenger cars. The tire, which will be produced at five plants in North America, will come with a 60,000-mile warranty.

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