8/22/2019

Tata Motors to Continue Sales in Thailand

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India’s Tata Motors Ltd. says it will continue export trucks to the Thai market after shutting down local assembly operations there at the end of March.

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India’s Tata Motors Ltd. says it will continue export trucks to the Thai market after shutting down local assembly operations there at the end of March.

The company has cut its showrooms and service centers in Thailand to 34 from 55 in mid-2018. Yet it claims that an expanded line of imported product will enable it to at least double sales in the fiscal year that began April 1, the Bangkok Post reports.

The newspaper notes that vehicles imported from India face tariffs as great as 40%. Tata had been assembling pickups and mini trucks at a factory in Bangkok. The facility was managed by local partner Bangchan General Assembly Co.

The plant has capacity to make 10,500 vehicles per year. Tata sales in Thailand peaked at 4,600 in fiscal 2012 but have declined steadily since then. Last year Tata sales in Thailand totaled only 1,000 units, the Post says.

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