| 1:41 PM EST

Toyota Tests Factory Fuel Cell Generator

Toyota Motor Corp. has begun testing a fuel cell-based electrical generator to help power its Honsha manufacturing plant in Toyota City, Japan.
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Toyota Motor Corp. has begun testing a fuel cell-based electrical generator to help power its Honsha manufacturing plant in Toyota City, Japan.

Comprised of two fuel stacks from a Mirai fuel cell car, the stationary generator has a rated output of 100 kW. The system also includes a power control unit and storage battery.

Toyota will run the generator continuously to test the system’s energy efficiency, power stability, consistency, durability and maintenance requirements. The carmaker then plans to install fuel cell generators at other global facilities.

Toyota also envisions eventually producing hydrogen onsite at its factories.

In addition to the Mirai, the company is developing fuel cell-powered trucks and buses. Toyota also uses fuel cell forklifts in some factories.

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