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| 2:10 PM EST

Volvo Adds Plug-In Hybrid XC40 Crossover

Volvo Car Corp. says the launch of a plug-in hybrid version of its new XC40 compact crossover vehicle makes the company the world’s first to offer such variants for all models. 
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Volvo Car Corp. says the launch of a plug-in hybrid version of its new XC40 compact crossover vehicle makes the company the world’s first to offer such variants for all models.

Volvo aims to achieve cumulative sales of 1 million electrified vehicles by 2025.

The XC40 T5 teams a 1.5-liter 3-cylinder engine with an electric motor to deliver a combined 262 hp. The hybrid powertrain is mated with a new 7-speed dual-clutch transmission.

Developed in partnership with parent Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, the hybrid system also will be used in the Chinese company’s Lynk 01 and 02 models. Geely debuted the powertrain on its flagship Borui GE sedan last year in China.

Volvo says the XC40 hybrid has an all-electric range of about 30 miles on the WLTP cycle. The vehicle’s 10.7 kWh battery can be recharged in 2.5 hours, according to the carmaker.

An all-electric version of the XC40 will be added next year. That model will be Volvo’s first full EV.

The traditionally powered XC40, offered with a wide choicde of small gasoline and diesel engines, was launched in 2017. The vehicle rides on Volvo’s Compact Modular Architecture, which also will carry the Polestar 2.

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